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1 Re: Long ago on 25/11/2011, 2:39 am

ems

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Don't know about you guys but i remember my husband in conversation he used to say ''kinda thing'' in or at the end of almost every sentence, i've been told that i use the word 'like' another popular one is 'you know'..not sure what put this in my head just thinking..ya know.

2 Re: Long ago on 14/11/2011, 10:11 am

jb49

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MarieB, you wrote

"Thinking of Christmas, I remember the smell of mice pies which my mum always made on Christmas eve for those coming back from midnight mass."

I'm crying big alligator tears for all of you unless you meant "mince" pies.

Love your stories everyone, keep them coming!

3 Long ago on 14/11/2011, 9:32 am

maggie may


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Hi all

Wow, I've really unleashed a veritable tsunami of memories!
Its absolutely fascinating to read them all and be able to identify with so many of them.

Marie B ; I'd forgotten that damned liberty vest. How I hated it, it itched like blazes and I spent the day scratching.
On St. Stephens day in Cork the tradition was to go around to all the churches visiting the Cribs, don't know if that was done elsewhere.
Of course the day began at crack of dawn when you would be roused from your sleep by ferocious knocking at the front door, followed by the raucous voices of the Wren boys singing "the wren, the wren, the king of all birds.....". They always put in a verse about the inhabitants of the house they were calling to.

Katie: going to Santa was the highlight, esp. here because our biggest toyshop, Kilgrews, had a slide up which you climbed and shot down into Santa's cave! The health and safety boffins would have a fit if they saw it, kids being pushed from behind so they went off head first, loud thumps as some heavier kids flattened Santa, one broken arm, but it was such fun.

jb49, I'd forgotten Cannon, I loved him.

Just remembered another one, the Mens Mission and the Womens Mission, where, for two weeks, the parish had the fear of God put into them by various Missioners.

Any more memories out there?

Maggie May
S

4 Long ago on 14/11/2011, 9:05 am

MarieB


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Thinking of Christmas, I remember the smell of mice pies which my mum always made on Christmas eve for those coming back from midnight mass. Unlike today, there was no visible sign of Christmas in our house untl after we went to bed on Christmas eve. Out would come the crib and then the lights for the tree which, without fail would never light first tme. The house was decorated by the morning and most of the decorations had been made by us children (paper chains and zig zag crepe shapes in a chain) .

My mother never went to bed on Christmas eve because everything depended on her. She woul slow cook the 'chicken' and ham and get the veg ready, not to mention wrapping all the presents and filling the stockings with tangerines, sweets and nuts. We only got one or two small presents as money was scarce,but my parents did the best they could with very little. Often we got secondhand toys which had been given anew lease of life. By today's standards, it was pitiful, but I don't remember feeling anything but delight with everything . Christmas was a magic time for me and I think much of that has been lost today. Having said that, I had sussed out Santy by the age of six whereas, my ten yr and eight yr old grandsons still avidly believe in him and were busy writing their letters last week.

Like Katie says, you went to at least 2 masses and dinner was one o'clock on the dot. My father would
get in from the pub having worked up an appetite with his many brothers. The woman's place was firmly
in the kitchen in those days.. These days, a lot of men cook the Christmas dinner and very well too.!
The woman are still left with the washing up though.
The rest of the day was a matter of stuffing as much food in as possible and falling asleep in front of the fire or listening to the radio.
St Stephens day or Boxing day as it was called in England, was a cotnuation of the feeding orgy fuelled by visits from ourvery large extended family who came to see my gran. My poor mother never stopped baking and making cups of tea.

Enough, MMay what have you started? I promise to shut up now......honest!

5 oldies on 14/11/2011, 8:08 am

cathy

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can anyody rmember the lace nets for windows made from butter paper beautifully cut out and stuck on the glass.
ling for dinner christmas eve .and the large crocks of jam as we called them
All the farm animals getting extra food on christmas eve
and it was said the animals talked at midnight .
there ws a lovely peace come over the house and farm it was very special . unfortunately living in town i havent found the same thing the scene last minute shoppers as if the world was to end
and pubs full..i got a rag doll called una one year andi had her for twelve years she was falling to pieces but i adored her..

cathy

6 Re: Long ago on 14/11/2011, 7:16 am

ems

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mmm nothing like mammy's christmas dinner Katie..see what you started maggie may? mind you there was an incident with my niece a couple of yrs ago when in the early hours of Christmas morning she woke up all of a sudden and shouted 'I HEAR SANTA' followed by b****x needless to say (her poor daddy) anyway yes i remember my mother making the trifle night before and steeping marrowfat mushy peas etccc..
ok enough of my babbling..

Ems

7 Re: Long ago on 14/11/2011, 6:45 am

katie


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Hey Marie,

Are you sure we're not related. Such a lot of your story struck a chord!

Thinking about christmas long ago, we lived in the country and a visit to town was a real treat, about twice a year, and one of those times was christmas, we ventured to the city. A visit to santa was a must. We stood in line, to visit him in the big store in the town. Two shillings and sixpence, and you got a white box filled with colouring pencils and a book and if you were really lucky, a toy. This adventure was followed by a visit to the Public House, women and children were only alowed in the snug, a little cubical cordoned off from the serious drinker. Here you got a mineral (orange or lemonade) and then it was off home.
On christmas morning, it was a full fried breakfast, not your usual porridge, oh no, rashers, sausages, puddings egg and toast, never mind that you had to eat christmas dinner at One O clock on the dot.

After breakfast it was off to mass. not just one mass, oh no, because it was christmas morning, there was a continuous string of masses, and if you were lucky, you got away with staying for two, but if you were being a bit sassy,lo and behold it would be three masses in succession. Home then by about 11.30 and at one o clock on the dot......Christmas Dinner! Hungry or not, it was, Soup, Turkey and Ham, stuffing, veg potatoes, gravy. Followed by Plum pudding and custard, followed by christmas cake and tea!

Now a days it would be off to weightwatchers next day!

Katie

8 Long ago on 14/11/2011, 2:23 am

MarieB


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just a couple more to add to my original spiel:

getting bathed in the dolly tub in front of the fire on a sat night (no bathroom or indoor loo) ? I went first, followed by my brothers. Having my hair washed in the sink and then drying it in front of the fire (no hairdryers) and putting rags in my hair to make ringlets so that I was Spick and span for mass on Sunday!

coming down to the kitchen first thing and finding the stone floor covered in cockroaches from the coal which was kept in a cupboard next to the range. My father always cleaned the grate of ashes and fixed the fire for the day so he always dealt with them. No trace by the time my mother got up.

wearing a liberty vest all winter. It was made of flannelette and made me itchy.
sleeping 3 in a bed, top to tail. Being scared to get ot of bed in case the bogeyman caught us.(seem to recall my gran telling us he lived under the stairs!)

Listening to the rag and bone man shouting "any old iron"and rattling plates as he walked through the back entries. of the row of terraced houses
Having sacks of coal deliverd on the backs of 'very dirty faced ' coal men .
Milk, fruit and veg were delivered by horse and cart. Very few cars in 1948

Waiting for a glimpse of my daddy coming home from working on the docks" He'd be riding his bike in all weathers I used to worry on dark foggy nights but he would suddenly appear from the pea soup with a big smile on his face"

Daddy doffing his hat as a mark of respect when he passed a church and woman having to wear a mantilla or head scarf in church. Seem to recall men and woman were segregated.
Going to mass(am), Sunday school(pm) and evening benediction as a matter of course on a Sunday .!
Fasting from midnight to take holy communion. Going to confession every week, desperately trying to make lists of plausible sins and being sure to disguise your voice so the priest wouldn't recognise you!

Better stop and give others a chance to reminisce . Could go on for ages but I'll just bore you all to death.

Who's next?



9 oldtv shows on 13/11/2011, 11:32 am

jb49

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Hey this could be an interesting thread.

I watched FiveO, Mcmillan and Wife, High Chaparral, Get Smart and Cannon.

Other oldy favourites include Ponderosa (or Bonanza) Gilligan's Island and the Beverley Hillbillies.

Saturday night though was Hockey Night in Canada on the TV. My Dad always did the haircuts for me and 3 younger brothers. Saturday night hockey and the haircuts coincided time wise. Being the oldest, I was the smartest. The first haircut was to get loosened up. It turned out poorly, don't be first. Second was the best turn, Dad was still interested. #2 spot haircut was usually okay. Three was chancy, Four spot was a bad turn cause the clippers were hot by then and your neck would be red. Any turn was bad if the game got exciting and a breakaway could result in a nicked ear as Dad followed the game instead of the clippers.

Then with 4 angelic boys in jammies, hair trimmed and ear(s) bandaged, ready to impress the church in the morning with our tidy appearance, we would have popcorn and gingerale with our wicked older ugly mean sisters. 1 bottle of ginger ale, 6 kids. It was poured into glasses very carefully lest someone would get ripped off. Course, my little brothers weren't as sly as me and the older wicked mean ugly and devious sisters showed me the way to get a portion of my little brothers' share. I still feel bad about cheating them to this day (no I don't). So that was Saturday night here: drinking GingerAle like little gentlemen, fresh haircuts, and popcorn being made by the sweet sisters.

10 Re: Long ago on 13/11/2011, 5:07 am

ems

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Good one Maggie may..Hawaii Five'o think was it (steve mc garrett)and of course 'book em' Danno' i loved it along with Cannon, anyone remember McMillan and wife? miceal o' hehir and his distinctive voice..

and on holidays in my granny's we had to collect buckets of water from the well..
yes the ten for a penny sweets clove rocks and bulls eyes can't remember others...

mmm I remember..

11 Long ago on 13/11/2011, 4:00 am

maggie may


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Hi all

I've been thinking about Ems suggestion of a topic about "long 'go" as we say in Cork and here are just a few random memories from the past.

Risking life and limb to toast bread on long toasting forks in the open fire.....toast has never been the same since.

Going to the childrens library, getting your quota of two books, then hiding the one you wanted to keep for next week behind the ancient radiator, all the while keeping an eye out for the Dragon Lady who guarded the desk. Suffering the torments of guilt when you heard that there had been yet another fire in the childrens section!!

Praying that a nun (any nun would do, they were so numerous) would shuffle off this mortal coil and give us all a day off school (even if we had to attend the funeral).

Getting "Robin starch" for mam and the distinctive smell of washing coming from all the houses every Monday.

Growing up with "Wanderly Wagon", Buntus Cainte (a programme to teach Irish, jb), "Get Smart", "The High Chaparral", and falling hopelessly head over heels with Danno in "Hawai 5 0", all in glorious black and white.

"shawlies" (women wearing black shawls)in the Coal Quay, and buying your turkey and Christmas tree there.

All the kids out playing on Christmas morning with their new prams and dollies, the boys with their footballs and guns, playing Red Indians and frightening the girls, who were busy playing "house" with their new dolls, all of us scrubbed, brushed and neat in our Christmas clothes.

Ten sweets for a penny in the sweet shops, and the agony of choosing which to buy.

Hot summers and freezing, snowy winters.

Listening to the match on the radio every Sunday with the incomparable Miceal O'Hehir.

May day processions at school.

Covering new school books with left over wallpaper.

Collecting the milk in glass bottles from outside the front door.

biscuits and tea being weighed then put into brown paper bags.

I'm sure some more will come to mind.

Maggie May

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